Tuesday, October 4, 2016

the best part of a bad day

This month we celebrate three years of making bad-ass tacos as a couple. Neither of us really seem to be into particular dates that are sentimental, but rather the whole month of October for the magic this season brings. On Sunday we paid a visit to a local farm and did the pumpkin-patch corn maze-deal. Glad I've got him to help wheel 156lbs of pumpkins when i can't pick just one...

The last days of September in 2012 were difficult. Really, the worst job site I've ever been on. Two days that that broke me down but also made me grow. Funny how the world works sometimes though - how the worst can also bring good people into your life. This is how I met Anthony. When asked, I joke I met him on a terrible day - true, but then reminisce how he was the best part of the bad day.

We were at the Olympic Sculpture Park. I was the event designer - working on production, he was the facility babysitter. He didn't need to stay as long as he did, or linger outside of the control room as much as he did. But as I stayed late the first night watching my crew level a tiered field with staging (a crazy task on it's own), and anticipating something to go wrong with the client (it totally did... and then some), he kept me company and we just chatted the night away.

The next day was a whirlwind with an abusive client. By the end of the set, I was tapped on the shoulder by my boss and ask how I was doing. For the first time in my life I experienced uncontrollable tears of relief, it was over (and successful)! I rushed to the restroom to clam myself down, passing Anthony on the way. As I was leaving the park I decided to do something I normally never do. Give a boy my number. I found him, passed him a business card, and said "we should be friends."

That year nothing really happened, the timing wasn't right. But exactly one year later we met again in October on another job site. This time around it worked out.

He is opposite from me in many ways. And by all means astrology doesn't really support a Cancer(he) dating an Aquarius (myself), but some how it does work. Analytical and quite the academic, he studied psychology extensively in college. He is a community guy, he brings people together and takes care of them, often the most responsible and dependable friend. He is a great mentor and coach. "I haven't found a thing in the world yet that can't be fixed with patience, research, and good help, one way or another."

So cheers to this season!

fading summer

summer is a slower time around the office and typically i have more time to goof around with personal projects. a leisurely time to play and enjoy some sunshine. but i know it has come to a close once September hits and business picks up in full force through the end of December...

in the spirit of remembering some of summer 2016's greatest hits, here are some previously unblogged bits and pieces~

in june our parents met at a BBQ in Anthony's lush garden. it was the first time we were all at the same place at the same time after nearly three years of dating. We cooked a pizza on the grill (it CAN be done!) and talked plants.

A summer of many faces, i donated these heart sunglasses to A, as they fit his head much better anyway. And this tomato out of his garden was growing a nose! it's hard to eat character filled produce... can't we just be friends?

my grandma Margaret passed this past April and it still feels like it's setting in. I helped my dad and his siblings clean out her apartment and took home a collection of photos. this was their wedding day in the early 40s.

farewell summer!

Sunday, August 14, 2016

Down to the River

As a late teen, I had an unrealistic view of the world where I would actually ignore things that got too real. I made a fantasy place for myself to avoid emotion and the unfavorable pieces of daily life. Of course this wasn't the healthiest, and came crashing down by the time I was 21... Whenever I had a moment of tension, I would be so angry with the person I was in conflict with for bursting my perfect bubble world. But really, I see now that it was always a form of self protection. A gentle soul. I'm not a crier per se, but I do break when too many things are happening at once around me on top of being a bit reclusive.

In a relatively brief conversation yesterday, a good friend made an interesting observation. When she gets busy with life and work, she just straight up stops contacting people. Not that she doesn't want to see folks, but she wishes she would reach out more. I think everybody suffers from that, but the two of us are very similar in that we're both so guilty. Personally I thrive on alone time, but there does come a point where alone is too alone!

I've had a lot of drastic mood swings the past few months, I feel off-balance. So many ups and downs over what seems so little upon reflection. I've seen so many beautiful moments, and hours later feel absolutely devastated. Maybe these are the times that alone is too alone. I keep my thoughts to myself so as to not be a burden on others (or so I think) but maybe these are the times to ask a friend to dinner vs feeling the absolute devastation I'll roll around in my own head.

The river is a place of euphoria. Yesterday we made it out on a nearly 90° day, perfect for the cold chill of the water. Looking around our own private slice of paradise, there were no airplanes, there were no cars. It was just us, water, trees, and mountains! This spot that is so disconnected, yet completely connected to the people you're there with.

Snoqualmie Middle Fork

Sunday, August 7, 2016

Melmont Ghost Town

I call this "Melmont Round 2" because it was the second time we've attempted it! A few months back Miss Sara and I found the Fairfax Bridge, but hiked down the wrong side to a dead end! We decided that we would return a different day knowing a little more about the unmarked trail.

Melmont was a coal town circa 1900 to about 1920. It was modest, and faded when Northern Pacific switched from steam engines to electric and diesel models. After the 1920s, wood from town buildings was sold and used to create other structure in the area, and the rest was destroyed in a fire. These days all you can find left is a small dynamite storage building, The foundation to the schoolhouse, and a big wall that used to be some sort of bridge. There's also a mystery car down by the river, but we didn't find it this go-round.

This is a beautiful day hike, the weather was mild, and the trail was fairly level. We walked about 9 miles! Sure, we were the bozos that walked through some poison oak, but overall this was a wonderful day!

On our way back through Wilkeson, I decided to detour down a side road. Wilkeson is also an old old town in these parts. Known for a sandstone quarry that faced the state capital, and for the ovens to process coal from sites like Melmont. On a whim we found the quarry, and the old ovens.